Smithsonian recognizes Cohen-Tanugi’s water desalination technology


February 25, 2013

graphene-desalination

Smithsonian magazine recently ranked nanoporous graphene, a novel material for water desalination developed in MIT’s Department of Materials Science & Engineering, in its ranking for the top five surprising scientific milestones of 2012. Nanoporous graphene is a one-atom-thick form of carbon with tiny holes that can block salt ions while letting water molecules through, enabling the production of potable water from the world’s virtually limitless supply of seawater. The new graphene membrane was first proposed last June by MIT graduate student David Cohen-Tanugi and Jeffrey C. Grossman, Associate Professor in MIT’s Department of Materials Science and Engineering, in the journal Nano Letters. Read more about the story here.

If you enjoyed this post, please consider leaving a comment or subscribing to the RSS feed to have future articles delivered to your feed reader.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>